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The price of peace : money, democracy, and the life of John Maynard Keynes / Zachary D. Carter.

Carter, Zachary D., (author.).

Available copies

  • 0 of 1 copy available at Sage Library System. (Show)
  • 0 of 1 copy available at Hood River County Library District.

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Summary:

"In the spring of 1934, Virginia Woolf sketched an affectionate three-page "biographical fantasy" of her great friend, John Maynard Keynes, attempting to encompass no less than 25 themes, which she jotted down at its opening: "Politics. Art. Dancing. Letters. Economics. Youth. The Future. Glands. Genealogies. Atlantis. Mortality. Religion. Cambridge. Eton. The Drama. Society. Truth. Pigs. Sussex. The History of England. America. Optimism. Stammer. Old Books. Hume." In truth, his life contained even more. Years earlier, as a young Cambridge philosopher and economist, Keynes spent his days moving between government service and academia, and when he was called up to the Treasury on the eve of World War I, he relished an opportunity to save the empire. He worked dutifully, but as the aftermath of the war and the disastrous Versailles Treaty unfolded, with its harsh demands for German reparations, Keynes saw how the strain on its citizens might encourage would-be authoritarians. The experience began a career that spanned two world wars and a global depression and which often found him in a Cassandra-like position, arguing against widely accepted ideas that he saw as outdated or dangerous. His influential ideas made it to America and FDR's New Deal in the Great Depression, and through his books, especially The General Theory, he became a founding giant in the economics profession. Even as his star rose, however, the most important allegiance of Keynes's life was to writers and artists. He valued his membership in the iconic Bloomsbury Group above any position, and he forever envied the talents of his friends like Virginia Woolf and Lytton Strachey, often providing them with much needed financial support as the most gainfully employed member of the group. In return, they gave him a moral compass and inspired his vision of what society should be."
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Circulation Modifier Age Hold Protection Active/Create Date Status Due Date
Hood River County Library 921 KEYNES 2020 (Text) 33892100694919 Adult New Books Book None 07/17/2020 Checked out 08/15/2020

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780525509035
  • ISBN: 0525509038
  • Physical Description: xxii, 628 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York : Random House, [2020]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 589-595) and index.
Summary, etc.:
"In the spring of 1934, Virginia Woolf sketched an affectionate three-page "biographical fantasy" of her great friend, John Maynard Keynes, attempting to encompass no less than 25 themes, which she jotted down at its opening: "Politics. Art. Dancing. Letters. Economics. Youth. The Future. Glands. Genealogies. Atlantis. Mortality. Religion. Cambridge. Eton. The Drama. Society. Truth. Pigs. Sussex. The History of England. America. Optimism. Stammer. Old Books. Hume." In truth, his life contained even more. Years earlier, as a young Cambridge philosopher and economist, Keynes spent his days moving between government service and academia, and when he was called up to the Treasury on the eve of World War I, he relished an opportunity to save the empire. He worked dutifully, but as the aftermath of the war and the disastrous Versailles Treaty unfolded, with its harsh demands for German reparations, Keynes saw how the strain on its citizens might encourage would-be authoritarians. The experience began a career that spanned two world wars and a global depression and which often found him in a Cassandra-like position, arguing against widely accepted ideas that he saw as outdated or dangerous. His influential ideas made it to America and FDR's New Deal in the Great Depression, and through his books, especially The General Theory, he became a founding giant in the economics profession. Even as his star rose, however, the most important allegiance of Keynes's life was to writers and artists. He valued his membership in the iconic Bloomsbury Group above any position, and he forever envied the talents of his friends like Virginia Woolf and Lytton Strachey, often providing them with much needed financial support as the most gainfully employed member of the group. In return, they gave him a moral compass and inspired his vision of what society should be." -- Provided by publisher.
Subject: Keynes, John Maynard, 1883-1946.
Economists > Great Britain > Biography.
Economics > History > 20th century.
Bloomsbury group.
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Economics / General.
Genre: Biographies.

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