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Available copies

  • 0 of 2 copies available at Sage Library System. (Show)
  • 0 of 1 copy available at Hood River County Library District.

Current holds

2 current holds with 2 total copies.

Summary:

"My adult life can be divided into two distinct parts," Eula Biss writes, "the time before I owned a washing machine and the time after." Having just purchased her first home, the poet and essayist now embarks on a provocative exploration of the value system she has bought into. Through a series of engaging exchanges-- in libraries and laundromats, over barstools and backyard fences-- she examines our assumptions about class and property and the ways we internalize the demands of capitalism. Described by The New York Times as a writer who "advances from all sides, like a chess player," Biss offers an uncommonly immersive and deeply revealing new portrait of work and luxury, of accumulation and consumption, of the value of time and how we spend it. Ranging from IKEA to Beyoncé to Pokemon, Biss asks, of both herself and her class, "In what have we invested?" -- from book jacket.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Circulation Modifier Age Hold Protection Active/Create Date Status Due Date
Hood River County Library 306.3 BIS 2020 (Text) 33892100702829 Adult New Books Book None 09/22/2020 On holds shelf -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780525537458
  • ISBN: 0525537457
  • Physical Description: 324 pages ; 22 cm
  • Publisher: New York : Riverhead Books, 2020.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 289-322).
Summary, etc.:
"My adult life can be divided into two distinct parts," Eula Biss writes, "the time before I owned a washing machine and the time after." Having just purchased her first home, the poet and essayist now embarks on a provocative exploration of the value system she has bought into. Through a series of engaging exchanges-- in libraries and laundromats, over barstools and backyard fences-- she examines our assumptions about class and property and the ways we internalize the demands of capitalism. Described by The New York Times as a writer who "advances from all sides, like a chess player," Biss offers an uncommonly immersive and deeply revealing new portrait of work and luxury, of accumulation and consumption, of the value of time and how we spend it. Ranging from IKEA to Beyoncé to Pokemon, Biss asks, of both herself and her class, "In what have we invested?" -- from book jacket.
Subject: Leisure > Social aspects.
Work > Social aspects.
Quality of life.

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