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Smart and spineless : exploring inverterbrate intelligence / Ann Downer.

Downer, Ann, 1960- (Author).

Available copies

  • 6 of 6 copies available at Sage Library System. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Hood River County Library District.

Current holds

0 current holds with 6 total copies.

Summary:

When we think of intelligent creatures, we often think of vertebrates, or animals with spinal columns and relatively large brains. We don't usually think of invertebrates, or animals without a spine. But invertebrates can be astonishingly intelligent. These animals exhibit surprising feats of learning, memory, and problem-solving using their relatively simple, tiny brains some the size of a sesame seed or even smaller. In fact, some intelligent invertebrates have no brain at all! Scientists around the world are putting invertebrate intelligence to use in mind-boggling ways. Engineers are designing swarmbots based on bees to take part in search-and-rescue efforts. And materials scientists are basing a new, tough ceramic on the structure of a mantis shrimp's claw. In Smart and Spineless, readers will be challenged to think in a whole new way about what it means to be smart!
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Circulation Modifier Age Hold Protection Active/Create Date Status Due Date
Hood River County Library J 592.13 DOW (Text) 33892100355511 Children's Non-Fiction Book None 11/04/2016 Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781467737395 (lib. bdg. : alk. paper)
  • Physical Description: 88 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Publisher: Minneapolis : Twenty-First Century Books, 2016.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
The not-so-lowly worm -- Jumping spiders: Portia -- Octopuses -- Honey bees and paper wasps -- Argentine ants -- Mantis shrimps -- Box jellyfish and slime molds -- Teeny, tiny minds?
Summary, etc.:
When we think of intelligent creatures, we often think of vertebrates, or animals with spinal columns and relatively large brains. We don't usually think of invertebrates, or animals without a spine. But invertebrates can be astonishingly intelligent. These animals exhibit surprising feats of learning, memory, and problem-solving using their relatively simple, tiny brains some the size of a sesame seed or even smaller. In fact, some intelligent invertebrates have no brain at all! Scientists around the world are putting invertebrate intelligence to use in mind-boggling ways. Engineers are designing swarmbots based on bees to take part in search-and-rescue efforts. And materials scientists are basing a new, tough ceramic on the structure of a mantis shrimp's claw. In Smart and Spineless, readers will be challenged to think in a whole new way about what it means to be smart!
Target Audience Note:
1210L Lexile.
Subject: Invertebrates > Psychology > Juvenile literature.

Additional Resources